Computer Crime is Big Business

Computer Crime is Big Business

Google engineer and computer security expert Justin Schuh was recently interviewed by Business Insider’s Jillian D’Onfro on the state of cybercrime and how the shift from “hacktivism” to “big business” has dangerous implications for data security.

Millennials as the GRC Generation: Addressing Transparency and Risk Management

Millennials as the GRC Generation: Addressing Transparency and Risk Management

We recently released a study on device security that showed a clear disparity between how Millennials and other generations treat corporate data. According to our 2015 US Mobile Device Security Report, Millennials (age 18-34) pose a greater risk to data security by engaging in greater personal use of corporate devices, changing default settings, and accessing risky content (personal email, online banking or shopping, social media, public WiFi, file sharing etc). This risk increases the higher in the organization you go.

Average Cost of Data Breach Rises to $3.79 Million

Average Cost of Data Breach Rises to $3.79 Million

The Ponemon Institute and IBM recently released the 2015 Cost of Data Breach Study which indicates that costs associated with data breaches continue to rise. The cost of a data breach in 2014 was $154 per record, up from $145 in 2013, a 6% increase. The average cost of a data breach to an organization increased 23% over the past 2 years to $3.79 million. In the case of mega-breaches, those which affected millions of people, the costs are even higher (and are not reflected in these average costs).

Don’t Let Data Be the “Bad Guy”

Don’t Let Data Be the “Bad Guy”

2014 marked a noticeable shift with data breaches, big brands and mega-breaches dominating the news. Data breaches became very public and the accountability for these data breaches shifted; we even saw the CEO of Target lose his job following a data breach. 2015 has continued along the same path, with high profile breaches such as the 80-million-customer breach suffered by Anthem.

Costs of Home Depot Breach Still Rising

Costs of Home Depot Breach Still Rising

The cost of the 2014 Home Depot data breach, which affected 56 million credit cards and 53 million emails, continues to rise. Home Depot is facing at least 44 lawsuits, including a class action suit for $500 million. According to first quarter reports for 2015, the costs continue to accumulate for Home Depot.

Security Awareness Not Translating to Accountability

Security Awareness Not Translating to Accountability

This month, we released the findings of our 2015 US Mobile Device Security Report showing that there are clear differences in generational behavior and risks to data security. Our report showed that Millennials (age 18-34) as a group pose the greatest risk to data security; this age group was most likely to modify default settings, use a work device for personal use, or access “not safe for work” content ranging from online banking and shopping to public WiFi and file sharing.

Millennials Represent Greatest Risk to Corporate Data: New Report

Millennials Represent Greatest Risk to Corporate Data: New Report

We just released the Absolute Software 2015 US Mobile Device Security Report, sharing the results of a survey conducted earlier this year among employees who use an employer-owned device for work. The results of the survey provide insight into employee attitudes toward IT security and their behaviors on corporate-owned mobile devices, showing an eye-opening perspective on the security risks depending on employee age, as well as other factors including company size, employee role and number of devices in use. According to our survey, Millennials prove to be a greater risk to data security as compared to other user categories.

Absolute Software Introduces Persistence Technology to Dell Android Devices

Absolute Software Introduces Persistence Technology to Dell Android Devices

Absolute Software announced last week an expanded agreement with Dell to embed Persistence technology in Android-powered Dell mobile devices. We began embedding Persistence technology in Dell devices in 2005 and are pleased to expand that coverage now.