Don’t Let Data Be the “Bad Guy”

Don’t Let Data Be the “Bad Guy”

2014 marked a noticeable shift with data breaches, big brands and mega-breaches dominating the news. Data breaches became very public and the accountability for these data breaches shifted; we even saw the CEO of Target lose his job following a data breach. 2015 has continued along the same path, with high profile breaches such as the 80-million-customer breach suffered by Anthem.

How to Embrace BYOD in the K-12 Classroom

How to Embrace BYOD in the K-12 Classroom

It has recently been estimated that BYOD in the K-12 classroom will hit 20% by the end of 2015, supporting the digitization of the classroom that is revolutionizing the learning experience. Thanks to technology, students have become “creators” rather than “consumers” of their learning experience. The introduction of mobile technology has been a challenge for many school districts, and the shift toward BYOD even more so. Deployment, training, management and security are all issues that school districts are faced with.

Costs of Home Depot Breach Still Rising

Costs of Home Depot Breach Still Rising

The cost of the 2014 Home Depot data breach, which affected 56 million credit cards and 53 million emails, continues to rise. Home Depot is facing at least 44 lawsuits, including a class action suit for $500 million. According to first quarter reports for 2015, the costs continue to accumulate for Home Depot.

Data Hygiene in the Healthcare

Data Hygiene in the Healthcare

David Blumenthal and Deven McGraw recently wrote an editorial article for The Journal of the American Medical Association on Keeping Personal Health Information Safe: The Importance of Good Data Hygiene. The article re-enforces what many security experts are saying, and what we also advocate here at Absolute, that most data breaches result from mundane problems: from poor “data hygiene,” if you will.

Setting The Data Security Foundation for Care.Data

Setting The Data Security Foundation for Care.Data

With the NHS care.data initiative finally set to launch, and an ever-increasing drive to increase mobility across the NHS, it will soon be much easier to share data securely across the NHS. These developments have the potential to transform health service delivery on many fronts.

HIPAA is Outdated: Does it Need an Update?

HIPAA is Outdated: Does it Need an Update?

The HIPAA Security Rule, created in 2003, establishes national standards to protect individuals’ electronic personal health information that is created, received, used, or maintained by a covered entity. In 2009, the Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health (HITECH) Act was signed into law, addressing some of the privacy and security concerns associated with the electronic transmission of health information. While the HITECH Act allows for greater enforcement of data breaches, what it does not do is strengthen the security standards by which the healthcare industry is held accountable. The question is: should HIPAA be updated so that the minimum standards are higher?

Security Awareness Not Translating to Accountability

Security Awareness Not Translating to Accountability

This month, we released the findings of our 2015 US Mobile Device Security Report showing that there are clear differences in generational behavior and risks to data security. Our report showed that Millennials (age 18-34) as a group pose the greatest risk to data security; this age group was most likely to modify default settings, use a work device for personal use, or access “not safe for work” content ranging from online banking and shopping to public WiFi and file sharing.

How to Mitigate the Millennials Risk

How to Mitigate the Millennials Risk

Millennials are the single largest generation in the US workforce. And they’re also the ones putting your data at risk. In our recently released 2015 US Mobile Device Security Report, we show how Millennials (age 18-34) are most likely to access content that puts data at risk, to modify default settings, and to use corporate-owned devices for personal work. And they do so knowing that these activities put data at risk.