Category: Data Visibility & Protection

How Klein Independent School District Maximizes Their 1:1 Program

Technology in our schools enables modern learning paths and brings a new level of innovation to the classroom. While it is inarguable that technology has enriched the lives of students, it has also introduced significant risk. Today’s K-12 technology leaders are faced with a multitude of challenges brought on by high-tech learning environments including student, faculty and staff safety and privacy, growing IT complexity, device loss and/or theft and demonstrable resource ROI. To track, manage, repair and recover across more than 37,000 endpoint devices, the Klein Independent School District (ISD) in Klein, Texas turned to Absolute.
Maximizing a One-to-One Computing Program
Klein ISD is known for its innovative culture and dedication to leveraging technology to empower students and staff to harness the latest advancements in education. It made perfect sense then when they deployed a one-to-one computing program that provisions one device for each student.
For the last ten years, Klein ISD has leveraged Absolute for its ability to provide a single source of truth into their device fleet and manage them remotely. They also rely on Absolute for deep analytics on device use and the protection of student, faculty and staff data. To deploy Absolute, Klein ISD simply activated the technology already embedded in each device at the manufacturer.
“Initially, stop loss was the primary reason we chose Absolute, but what keeps us at the table today is their ability to provide us with more information about what’s being stored on the devices and what’s being utilized,” said Chris Cummings, Information Technology, Teaching & Learning, Klein ISD. “I continue to choose Absolute because of their innovation. They help us stay ahead of compliance and offer the latest advantages to our students and faculty.” 
Peace of Mind
Nationally, cybersecurity spend is on the rise. The 2019 CIO Agenda K-12 Education Industry Insight report from Gartner found that 47 percent of K-12 organizations plan to make cybersecurity their primary investment. However, recent research by Absolute found that, in the complex world of endpoint security, increased security spending does not equate to increased safety. In fact, every additional security tool only increases the probability of failure as agents and controls conflict with one another on the endpoint.
According to global Absolute research, Cybersecurity and Education: The State of the Digital District in 2020, 38 percent of patch agents require at least one repair monthly and 28 percent of encryption agents fail monthly. Without visibility and control of endpoint devices, students and districts are exposed.
For Klein ISD, this meant a reliance on Absolute for their tamper-proof device visibility and control for a persistent, self-healing connection between IT and all devices, whether they are on or off the network.
“It’s one thing to implement a security program; it’s another to measure the effectiveness of your security program,” Cummings added. “And with Absolute, we’re able to verify just how effective our program really is.”
Understanding what’s happening on the devices, responding to suspicious events, and empowering applications to persist and automating their restoration when incidents occurs is the key. To learn more about how Klein ISD benefits from Absolute, download the full case study: The Power of Persistence Maximizes Klein Independent School District One-to-One Computing Program.

Absolute CEO Christy Wyatt Recognized as Top 50 Women Leaders in SaaS of 2019

This week, The Software Report released their Top 50 Women Leaders in SaaS of 2019. It’s a distinguished group and their list of accomplishments across the software industry is both impressive and inspiring. We’d like to congratulate all the 2019 leader awardees and give a special shout out to one honoree in particular – our CEO Christy Wyatt.

Christy’s first-position ranking comes as a result of her ‘dedication to solving Absolute customers’ greatest enterprise resiliency challenges’ and long pedigree of leadership roles across the software industry. Congratulations to everyone on the Top 50 and our own Christy Wyatt!
Read the full list here.

It’s Time To Solve K-12’s Cybersecurity Crisis

This post was originally published in Forbes magazine by Louis Columbus.

There were a record 160 publicly-disclosed security incidents in K-12 during the summer months of 2019, exceeding the total number of incidents reported in all of 2018 by 30%.
47% of K-12 organizations are making cybersecurity their primary investment, yet 74% do not use encryption.
93% of K-12 organizations rely on native client/patch management tools that have a 56% failure rate, with 9% of client/patch management failures never recovered.

These and many other fascinating insights are from Absolute’s new research report, Cybersecurity and Education: The State of the Digital District in 2020​, focused on the state of security, staff and student safety, and endpoint device health in K-12 organizations. The study’s findings reflect the crisis the education sector is facing as they grapple with high levels of risk exposure – driven in large part by complex IT environments and a digitally savvy student population – that have made them a prime target for cybercriminals and ransomware attackers. The methodology is based on data from 3.2M devices containing Absolute’s endpoint visibility and control platform, active in 1,200 K-12 organizations in North America (U.S. and Canada). Please see full report for complete details on the methodology.
Here’s the backdrop:

K-12 cybersecurity incidents are skyrocketing, with over 700 reported since 2016 with 160 occurring during the summer of 2019 alone. Educational IT leaders face the challenge of securing increasingly complex IT environments while providing access to a digitally savvy student population capable of bypassing security controls. Schools are now the second-largest pool of ransomware victims, just behind local governments and followed by healthcare organizations. As of today, 49 school districts have been hit by ransomware attacks so far this year.

“Today’s educational IT leaders have been tasked with a remarkable feat: adopting and deploying modern learning platforms, while also ensuring student safety and privacy, and demonstrating ROI on security and technology investments,” said Christy Wyatt, CEO of Absolute.
Research from Absolute found:
K-12 IT leaders are now responsible for collectively managing more than 250 unique OS versions, and 93% are managing up to five versions of common applications. The following key insights from the study reflect how severe K-12’s cybersecurity crisis is today:

Digital technologies’ rapid proliferation across school districts has turned into a growth catalyst for K-12’s cybersecurity crisis. 94% of school districts have high-speed internet, and 82% provide students with school-funded devices through one-to-one and similar initiatives. Absolute found that funding for educational technology has increased by 62% in the last three years. The Digital Equity Act goes into effect this year, committing additional federal dollars to bring even more technology to the classroom. K-12 IT leaders face the daunting challenge of having to secure on average 11 device types, 258 unique operating systems versions and over 6,400 unique Chrome OS extensions and more, reflecting the broad scale of today’s K-12 cybersecurity crisis. Google Chromebooks dominate the K-12 device landscape. The following graphic illustrates how rapidly digital technologies are proliferating in K-12 organizations:

42% of K-12 organizations have staff and students regularly bypass security endpoint controls using web proxies and rogue VPN apps, inadvertently creating gateways for malicious outsiders to breach their schools’ networks. Absolute found that there are on average 10.6 devices with web proxy/rogue VPN apps per school and 319 unique web proxy/rogue VPN apps in use today, including “Hide My Ass” and “IP Vanish.”  Many of the rogue VPN apps originate in China, and all of them are designed to evade web filtering and other content controls. With an average of 10.6 devices per school harboring web proxies and rogue VPN apps, schools are also at risk of non-compliance with the Children’s Internet Protection Act (CIPA).

While 68% of education IT leaders say that cybersecurity is their top priority, 53% rely on client/patch management tools that are proving ineffective in securing their proliferating IT infrastructures. K-12 IT leaders are relying on client/patch management tools to secure the rapidly proliferating number of devices, operating systems, Chrome extensions, educational apps, and unique application versions. Client/patch management agents fail 56% of the time, however, and 9% never recover. There are on average, nine daily encryption agents’ failures, 44% of which never recover. The cybersecurity strategy of relying on native client/patch management isn’t working, leading to funds being wasted on K-12 security controls that don’t scale:

“Wyatt continued, this is not something that can be achieved by simply spending more money… especially when that money comes from public funds. The questions they each need to be asking are if they have the right foundational security measures in place, and whether the controls they have already invested in are working properly. Without key foundational elements of a strong and resilient security approach in place – things like visibility and control, it becomes nearly impossible to protect your students, your data, and your investments.”
Providing greater device visibility and endpoint security controls while enabling applications and devices to be more resilient is a solid first step to solving the K-12 cybersecurity crisis. Thwarting the many breach and ransomware attacks K-12 organizations receive every day needs to start by considering every device as part of the network perimeter. Securing K-12 IT networks to the device level delivers asset management and security visibility that native client/patch management tools lack. Having visibility to the device level also gives K-12 IT administrators and educators insights into how they can tailor learning programs for broader adoption. The greater the visibility, the greater the control. K-12 IT administrators can ensure internet safety policies are being adhered to while setting controls to be alerted of a suspicious activity or non-compliant devices, including rogue VPNs or stolen devices. Absolute’s Persistence platform provides a persistent connection to each endpoint in a K-12’s one-to-one program, repairing or replacing critical apps that have been disabled or removed.
You can download the full Absolute report here.

5 Things to Check Off Your Security Checklist in October

October is National Cybersecurity Awareness Month, and the very existence of this ‘holiday’ affirms it is more important than ever to make sure your digital data is secure. To help get you on the right track, we’ve put together a quick security checklist of five simple, but impactful, steps you can take to better protect yourself today. 
1) Update your Operating System.
Updates and patches for your Operating System and applications are made available almost daily.  In many cases, these updates and security fixes are essential to keep your computer healthy and your data safe. If you find it tiresome keeping on top of these important updates, turn on Auto-Update.
2) Download, Activate and Keep Antivirus, Anti-malware and Firewall Software Up to Date.
Antivirus, anti-malware and firewall software can protect your device and data from malicious activity in the form of corrupted files, attack code and processes. Don’t forget to install, activate and keep these essential security features up to date.
3) Pay Attention to Passwords.
Strong password hygiene is worth emphasizing and repeating. Don’t use the same password for everything; use unique combinations of 8-14 uppercase and lowercase letters, numbers, and non alphanumeric characters. You must also make sure to keep your passwords somewhere safe. Storing them digitally in an encrypted password protector is often a good choice, but you can always write them down in a book the old-fashioned way.
4) Backup your Important Files.
Determine what’s mission critical, and create and keep multiple backups of your most important data, just in case. Store the files in the cloud via a trusted service provider; on secure flash drives or external hard drives; or using physical media like DVDs. If the unthinkable happens and your primary machine is corrupted, lost, or stolen, you’ll be glad you did.
5) Do not click on suspicious links or open questionable attachments received via email.
Even if (you think) an email comes from someone that you know, use caution. Phishing and email scams are a persistent method of computer infection. Always double check the sender’s email address, attachment filenames and extensions for abnormalities. If it doesn’t feel genuine, it probably isn’t.
Have you already taken these precautions? Do you travel with your laptop often? Absolute Home & Office can provide an extra layer of security and control by enabling you to Locate your machine on a map, Lock or Delete it’s contents remotely or, in the case of an actual theft, communicate with authorities to Recover it. Absolute Home & Office Premium is available for 33% off until October 31st.

Absolute Named Leader in G2 Fall 2019 Grid Report for Endpoint Management

Thanks to high levels of customer satisfaction and positive reviews from verified users, G2 has – for the second time this year – named Absolute a leader in the Fall 2019 Grid Report for Endpoint Management Software. Absolute ranked 10th overall out of 150 total vendors in the category, and was named a top vendor based on positive verified user reviews and high levels of customer satisfaction. The reviews highlight the power of the Absolute platform in delivering endpoint security and resiliency.
With more than 790,000 verified user reviews on the platform, G2 helps buyers make more informed purchasing decisions, allowing them to compare the best software and services for their needs based on peer reviews, satisfaction scores, and synthesized social data.
“Absolute is the last-stand in our IT security profile. I like how it integrates with the BIOS to do its thing most of all. Once installed, it’s essentially and hands-off piece of software. And because it is at that low level it can do many things that similar software cannot. But I would be remiss if I didn’t mention the ability to track and recover lost or stolen laptops.” – Senior Network Administrator/IT Manager
Christy Wyatt, CEO of Absolute had this to say about inclusion in the recently released G2 Grid Report: “We are honored and grateful that our customers are willing to go to bat for us and publicly recognize our product innovation, execution, and dedication to continuous optimization and improvement. At Absolute, our number one goal is to be a trusted partner in making our customers more resilient and deliver the visibility, persistence, and intelligence they need to securely and confidently move their businesses forward.”
Get the full G2 Fall 2019 Grid Report for Endpoint Management Software here. To learn more about what real users have to say about Absolute or to leave your own review, visit our G2 profile.

How Machine Learning Can Avert Cyber Disasters

High winds capable of downing power lines across a very-dry Northern California are causing officials to shutoff power this week for hundreds of thousands of residents. The decision came as a way to reduce the threat of wildfires in an area already hard-hit by natural disaster.
Mother Nature is once again flexing her powerful muscles and Californians are left to cope as best they can, with the information they have. This week’s weather event is yet another example of why researchers are working on how to use machine learning (ML) as a disaster preparedness and response tool. Because machines can quickly analyze massive amounts of data from numerous sources, the goal is to use that information to help community leaders and emergency response teams make more informed decisions.
Like natural disaster preparedness and response, ML also has important implications for endpoint security and the disaster that could originate on an endpoint while under cyberattack. As our CTO, Nicko van Someren explains in the below video prepared for National Cybersecurity Awareness Month, ML is key to improved security by way of a direct pull through from IT asset management.
An IT Asset Management Job with a Security Outcome
Within the context of IT asset management, organizations are busier than ever trying to manage the growing number of endpoint devices, applications and data. IT complexity has reached all-time highs. ML has been a very valuable tool for managing that complexity and, while doing so, can also make direct contributions to better security and more resilient endpoints. With the power of ML, you’re not only gaining improved visibility into your assets, you’re learning more about the actions and events happening there and finding patterns.
With patterns inevitably come outliers and so often, that’s where vulnerabilities hide. Being able to recognize outliers and remediating any resulting risk is how endpoints – and enterprises – become more resilient.
As Nicko explains: “Keeping machines up to date is an IT management job, but it’s a security outcome. Knowing what devices should be on my network is an IT management problem, but it has a security outcome. And knowing what’s going on and what processes are running and what’s consuming network bandwidth is an IT management problem, but it’s a security outcome. I don’t see these as distinct activities so much as seeing them as multiple facets of the same problem space.”
The growing number of assets is a challenge, certainly. And as security becomes an increasingly critical risk, organizations have been layering on more and more security tools – ten or more agents on each endpoint, says our research. But increased security spend does not equate to improved security. That much is painfully clear. Instead, you’re left with a complex environment full of competing, fallible agents and, consequently, a false sense of security.
Visibility is key and ML can deliver a complete data set that then gives you invaluable insight on what is happening on your endpoints. This way, you can work to reduce complexity and improve endpoint resiliency.
To learn more about the role of ML with IT complexity, watch our newest Cybersecurity Insights video below. And, subscribe to our complete YouTube series.
Complexity is Killing IT

Cybercriminals Take Aim at K-12

The school year is underway and millions of devices are now in the hands of students. More than 80 percent of today’s K-12 organizations provide computers to students and an estimated 70 percent of schools will be one-to-one by 2020.  With school-issued devices commonplace, schools have become easy targets for cyberattacks.
Since 2016, nearly 700 cyber incidents have hit K-12 organizations. And threats like ransomware have forced schools to close their doors, and even compelled Louisiana’s Governor to declare a state of emergency after several schools were wrecked by the Ryuk ransomware in the summer of 2019.
The K-12 attack surface has lured cybercriminals, but the technology itself has also become somewhat of a nightmare. In Absolute’s new study, Cybersecurity and Education: The State of the Digital District in 2020, we looked at 3.2 million devices across 1,200 schools and discovered over 6,400 unique Chrome extensions in-use, 319 security bypass apps (e.g. rogue VPN), and more than 130,000 app versions. The IT complexity is staggering.

Based on the new research, we see three key challenges facing today’s K-12 technology leaders – challenges no other industry faces.

Savvy students — more than five times as many tools for users to tunnel around security controls and policies than other sectors. (rogue apps were found in 42 percent of organizations)

Increased complexity — within five years, K-12 IT leaders have gone from managing a couple of operating systems, a handful of apps, and a few hundred devices to managing hundreds of versions of operating systems, apps, extensions, and thousands of devices. (93 percent of common apps are outdated)

Increased endpoint risk — as complexity expands, so does risk, leaving both students and schools increasingly vulnerable to cyberattacks. Case in point: schools have become the second-largest pool of ransomware victims, slightly behind local governments and closely followed by healthcare organizations. (56 percent of patch agents fail)

It is no surprise then, that 68 percent of K-12 IT leaders say cybersecurity is their top priority, and nearly half (47 percent) say their primary investment will be security controls and tools. But K-12 IT leaders must carefully consider their plans for more security spend and take aim at cyber resilience above all else.
School districts are saddled with the expectation to demonstrate ROI (the effects of the one-to-one program) but on the other hand, they need to keep tabs on security and inventory gaps in a quickly growing endpoint population. Read: Quantifying K-12 Device Use with Absolute.
How do you solve the riddle? Resilience is the key.
Winning the Battle Against Cyber Threats
It is increasingly critical school districts work to reduce IT complexity and improve endpoint resiliency by gaining visibility to every device everywhere. Then, IT leaders can identify use patterns, justify tech spend for maximum ROI, and discover device use patterns and rogue apps, how often devices are used, and what risks students are creating. K-12 IT leaders can rely on Absolute to unmask complexity risks and automate endpoint security—restoring fragile security controls, apps, and agents—to safeguard digital learning for the next generation.
To learn more about the cyber risks facing today’s K-12 schools, download the full report Cybersecurity and Education: The State of the Digital District in 2020.
 

5 Key Insights From Absolute’s 2019 Endpoint Security Trends Report

This post was originally published by Forbes Magazine and Software Strategies blog.

Endpoint security tools are 24% of all IT security spending, and by 2020 global IT security spending will reach $128B according to Morgan Stanley Research.
70% of all breaches still originate at endpoints, despite the increased IT spending on this threat surface, according to IDC.

To better understand the challenges organizations have securing the proliferating number and type of endpoints, Absolute launched and published their 2019 Endpoint Security Trends Report. You can get a copy of the report here. Their findings and conclusions are noteworthy to every organization who is planning and implementing a cybersecurity strategy. Data gathered from over 1B change events on over 6M devices is the basis of the multi-phased methodology. The devices represent data from 12,000 anonymized organizations across North America and Europe. Each device had Absolute’s Endpoint Resilience platform activated. The second phase of the study is based on exploratory interviews with senior executives from Fortune 500 organizations. For additional details on the methodology, please see page 12 of the study.
Key insights from the report include the following:

Increasing security spending on protecting endpoints doesn’t increase an organizations’ safety and in certain cases, reduces it. Organizations are spending more on cybersecurity than ever before, yet they aren’t achieving greater levels of safety and security. Gartner’s latest forecast of global information security and risk management spending is forecast to reach $174.5B in 2022, attaining a five-year Compound Annual Growth Rate (CAGR) of 9.2%. Improving endpoint controls is one of the highest-priority investments driving increased spending. Over 70% of all breaches are still originating at endpoints, despite millions of dollars spent by organizations every year. It’s possible to overspend on endpoint security and reduce its effectiveness, which is a key finding of the study. IBM Security’s most recent Cost of a Data Breach Report 2019 found that the average cost of a data breach in the U.S. grew from $3.54M in 2006 to $8.19M in 2019, a 130% increase in 14 years.
The more complex and layered the endpoint protection, the greater the risk of a breach. One of the fascinating findings from the study is how the greater the number of agents a given endpoint has, the higher the probability it’s going to be breached. Absolute found that a typical device has ten or more endpoint security agents installed, each conflicting with the other. MITRE’S Cybersecurity research practice found there are on average, ten security agents on each device, and over 5,000 common vulnerabilities and exposures (CVEs) found on the top 20 client applications in 2018 alone. Enterprises are using a diverse array of endpoint agents, including encryption, AV/AM, and Endpoint Detection and Response (EDR). The wide array of endpoint solutions make it nearly impossible to standardize a specific test to ensure security and safety without sacrificing speed. Absolute found organizations are validating their endpoint configurations using live deployments that often break and take valuable time to troubleshoot. The following graphic from the study illustrates how endpoint security is driving risk:

Endpoint security controls and their associated agents degrade and lose effectiveness over time. Over 42% of endpoints experience encryption failures, leaving entire networks at risk from a breach. They’re most commonly disabled by users, malfunction or have error conditions or have never been installed correctly in the first place. Absolute found that endpoints often failed due to the fragile nature of their encryption agents’ configurations. 2% of encryption agents fail every week, and over half of all encryption failures occurred within two weeks, fueling a constant 8% rate of decay every 30 days. 100% of all devices experiencing encryption failures within one year. Multiple endpoint security solutions conflict with each other and create more opportunities for breaches than avert them:

4. One in five endpoint agents will fail every month, jeopardizing the security and safety of IT infrastructure while prolonging security exposures. Absolute found that 19% of endpoints of a typical IT network require at least one client or patch management repair monthly. The patch and client management agents often require repairs as well. 75% of IT teams reported at least two repair events, and 50% reported three or more repair events. Additionally, 5% could be considered inoperable, with 80 or more repair events in the same one-month. Absolute also looked at the impact of families of applications to see how they affected the vulnerability of endpoints and discovered another reason why endpoint security is so difficult to attain with multiple agents. The 20 most common client applications published over 5,000 vulnerabilities in 2018. If every device had only the top ten applications (half), that could result in as many as 55 vulnerabilities per device just from those top ten apps, including browsers, OSs, and publishing tools. The following graphic summarizes the rates of failure for Client/Patch Management Agent Health:

5. Activating security at the device level creates a persistent connection to every endpoint in a fleet, enabling greater resilience organization-wide. By having a persistent, unbreakable connection to data and devices, organizations can achieve greater visibility and control over every endpoint. Organizations choosing this approach to endpoint security are unlocking the value of their existing hardware and network investments. Most important, they attain resilience across their networks. When an enterprise network has persistence designed to the device level, there’s a constant, unbreakable connection to data and devices that identifies and thwarts breach attempts in real-time. 
Bottom Line:  Identifying and thwarting breaches needs to start at the device level by relying on secured, persistent connections that enable endpoints to better detecting vulnerabilities, defending endpoints, and achieve greater resilience overall.
 

The Apple MacBook Pro Recall: What You Need to Know and What Absolute Is Doing to Speed Up the Process for IT

Life happens and things go wrong. We get it. Technology is one area that, when things go wrong, the impact can be particularly painful. By its very nature, technology is unpredictable, so you can’t eliminate every challenge. But you can be prepared for a swift response to minimize the pain.
The recent Apple recall on the batteries used in 15-inch MacBook Pro units sold between September 2015 and February 2017 is yet another reminder that modern work life is fallible. It’s also  reminiscent of the 2017 Samsung Note 7 fires that were the result of a battery issue, and let’s not forget HP in 2018 and Lenovo in 2014. The point is, recalls happen across the industry.
In Apple’s recent case, they determined that, “in a limited number of older generation 15-inch MacBook Pro units, the battery may overheat and pose a fire safety risk.” The recall was quickly followed up with a FAA ban on the laptops which then caused airlines to ban travelers from bringing them on flights either as cargo or in carry-on baggage.
So, imagine my surprise when I showed up at the airport last week and was asked to surrender my MacBook to an airport locker in order to board my flight. It got me thinking …shouldn’t enterprise IT teams have a way to quickly know and identify if any of their corporate-issued laptops are on any recall list? I, for one, am not about to hand over my laptop to any airline representative, security agent or otherwise. It’s almost 2020 – our focus as a cyber industry needs to shift to enabling IT and security teams with swift information, an “easy button” in managing their device fleets and above all, resilience.
The Power of Resilience
Minimizing potentially painful technology issues starts with full visibility into every endpoint in your fleet, where they are, and who they are assigned to. Armed with this information, you can alert your users and if need be, let them know their devices need to be replaced.
This is endpoint resilience.
With the MacBook recall, the proposed ‘fix’ from Apple is to visit a website and manually input every serial number to find out if it has been affected. Not ideal.
How to Take Swift Action on the Apple MacBook Battery Recall
Enterprise IT and Security teams need to be able to quickly look across their full inventory of device vendors, easily check for any recalled devices, and generate a report on make and model of devices, serial numbers, and the location of those devices. What they need is an ‘easy button’ for when situations like this arise.
This is just one way Absolute supports our customers. Using the Absolute console, it’s easy to create a bespoke report that inventories your fleet of devices – make, model, serial number, location, and recall status. In light of the recent Apple recall, we’ve done it for you to save you the time it would take to go through the complex process of having to sift through your device fleet or visit a website to add hundreds if not thousands of device serial numbers.
To find out if you have affected devices, Absolute customers should go to their Reports page. You will see the ‘15-inch MacBook Pro Battery Recall – Affected Devices’ report in the ‘Custom’ section.
And if you’re not yet an Absolute customer, reach out. We’re here to help.

Back to School – Laptop Theft 101

Stop me if you’ve heard this one before: Did you know that according to Gartner, a laptop is stolen every 53 seconds? It’s not a joke. According to the University of Pittsburgh your laptop has a 1 in 10 chance of being stolen and a nearly 98% chance of never being recovered. Did you also know that nearly HALF of all laptop thefts occur in classrooms?
Most students aren’t likely to to think twice about the value of data on their laptop; they instead think the device itself holds the true value. This couldn’t be further from the truth. The true price of a lost or stolen education device goes far beyond the value of the machine itself. Think of the countless hours and crushing brain energy spent researching and drafting your final thesis, sculpting your musical magnum opus, or the 2,000+ layer Photoshop or Illustrator file you’ve contributed to every week and weekend for the last 4 months of your life. Truth is the data on your device represents irreplaceable concentration, time and effort – invaluable commodities in today’s fast paced digital landscape.
Losing a device is one thing, but losing the data on it – potentially hundreds of hours of work – can drastically interfere with your education goals not to mention cause additional stress during an already difficult time of your life. Don’t take that risk.
Of course there are software ‘solutions’ like popular anti-theft products but they’re bulky, expensive, and stop short of offering TRUE protection. Sure, many can tell you the location of your device but will they actually assist in the RECOVERY of your device once it’s missing or stolen?
What then can be done to protect your device AND it’s data? Beyond protective software, you can start by practicing our top ten recommendations for laptop security:

Never leave your laptop unattended .
Keep your laptop in a secure, hidden place .
Lock doors and windows when you’re not in your room .
Use a discreet laptop case .
Never leave your laptop in your vehicle .
Purchase a Laptop Theft Recovery Solution .
Personalize your laptop’s looks .
Write down your laptop’s serial number .
Use secure passwords and update them regularly .
If someone tries to take it, give it up – it can be replaced… you can’t !

What happens when even these tried and true methods fail, I hear you ask?
Luckily there is one solution that can and will go the extra distance; Absolute Home & Office, with features including device locate, remote content lock and delete, as well as a theft recovery team who works with local law enforcement to actually recover your stolen or missing device. Education pricing is $29.99 for a PREMIUM 1 year plan, or you can get the STANDARD product for just $1.99/month.
Stay safe out there.

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