Category: Endpoint Security

Why Cybersecurity Needs To Focus More On Customer Endpoints

This article originally appeared in Forbes. 

Cloud-based endpoint protection platforms (EPP) are proliferating across enterprises today as CIOs and CISOs prioritize greater resiliency in their endpoint security strategies going into 2020.
Gartner predicts that Global Information Security and Risk Management end-user spending is forecast to grow at a five-year CAGR of 9.2% to reach $174.5 billion in 2022, with approximately $50B spent on endpoint security.
Endpoint security tools are 24% of all IT security spending, and by 2020 global IT security spending will reach $128B according to Morgan Stanley Research.
70% of all breaches still originate at endpoints, despite the increased IT spending on this threat surface, according to IDC.

There’s a surge of activity happening right now in enterprises that are prioritizing more resiliency in their endpoint security strategies going into 2020. The factors motivating CIOs, CISOs, IT, and Practice Directors to prioritize endpoint resiliency include more effective asset management based on real-time data while securing and ensuring every endpoint can heal itself using designed-in regenerative software at the BIOS level of every device. CIOs say the real-time monitoring helps reduce asset management operating expense, a big plus many of them appreciate give their tight budgets. Sean Maxwell, Chief Commercial Officer at Absolute, says, “Trust is at the center of every endpoint discussion today as CIOs, CISOs and their teams want the assurance every endpoint will be able to heal itself and keep functioning.”
The Endpoint Market Is Heating Up Going Into 2020
There are over thirty vendors competing in the endpoint security market right now. A few of the most interesting are Absolute Software, Microsoft, Palo Alto Networks, and others who are seeing a surge of activity from enterprises based on discussions with CIOs and CISOs. Absolute Software’s Persistence self-healing endpoint security technology is embedded in the firmware of more than 500 million devices and gives CIOs, CISOs and their team’s complete visibility and control over devices and data. Absolute is the leading visibility and control platform that provides enterprises with tamper-proof resilience and protection of all devices, data, and applications.
Like Absolute, Microsoft is unique in how they are the only vendor to provide built-in endpoint protection at the device level, with the core focus being on the OS. Windows 10 has Windows Defender Antivirus now integrated at the OS level, the same System Center Endpoint Protection delivers in Windows 7 and 8 OS. Microsoft Defender Advanced Threat Protection (ATP) incident response console aggregates alerts and incident response activities across Microsoft Defender ATP, Office 365 ATP, Azure ATP, and Active Directory, in addition to Azure.
Further evidence of how enterprise customers are placing a high priority on endpoint security is the increase in valuations of key providers in this market, including Absolute Software (TSE: ABT) and others. Absolute’s stock price has jumped 13% in just a month, following their latest earnings announcement on November 12th with a transcript of their earnings call here. Absolute’s CEO Christy Wyatt commented during the company’s most recent earnings call that, “The ability to utilize near real-time data from the endpoint to… to deliver actionable insights to IT about where controls are failing and the ability to apply resilience to self-heal and reinforce those security controls will become a critical skill for every one of our customers. This is the essence of Absolute’s platform, which adds resiliency to our customers operations.” It’s evident from what CIOs and CISOs are saying that resiliency is transforming endpoint security today and will accelerate in 2020.
Key Takeaways From Conversations With Enterprise Cybersecurity Leaders
The conversations with CIOs, CISOs, and IT Directors provided valuable insights into why resiliency is becoming a high priority for endpoint security strategies today. The following are key takeaways from the conversations:

Known humorously as the “fun button” cybersecurity teams enjoy being able to brick any device any time while monitoring the activity happening on it in real-time. One CIO told the story of how their laptops had been given to a service provider who was supposed to destroy them to stay in compliance with the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA), and one had been resold on the back market, ending up in a 3rd world nation. As the hacker attempted to rebuild the machine, the security team watched as each new image was loaded, at which time they would promptly brick the machine. After 19 tries, the hacker gave up and called the image re-build “brick me.”
IT budgets for 2020 are flat or slightly up, with many CIOs being given the goal of reducing asset management operating expenses, making resiliency ideal for better managing device costs. The more effectively assets are managed, the more secure an organization becomes. That’s another motivating factor motivating enterprises to adopt resiliency as a core part of the endpoint security strategies.
One CIO was adamant they had nine software agents on every endpoint, but Absolute’s Resilience platform found 16, saving the enterprise from potential security gaps. The gold image an enterprise IT team was using had inadvertently captured only a subset of the total number of software endpoints active on their networks. Absolute’s Resilience offering and Persistence technology enabled the CIO to discover gaps in endpoint security the team didn’t know existed before.
Endpoints enabled with Resiliency have proven their ability to autonomously self-heal themselves, earning the trust of CIOs and CISOs, who are adopting Absolute to alleviate costly network interruptions and potential breaches in the process. 19% of endpoints across a typical IT network require at least one client or patch management repair monthly, according to Absolute’s 2019 Endpoint Security Trends Report. The report also found that increasing security spending on protecting endpoints doesn’t increase an organizations’ safety – and in some instances, reduces it. Having a systematic, design-in solution to these challenges gives CIOs, CISO, and their teams greater peace of mind and reduces expensive interruptions and potential breaches that impede their organizations’ growth.

For more on coming endpoint security trends, download our 2019 Endpoint Security Trends Report.

Schools Under Cyber Siege Need a Path to Resilience

Originally published in THE Journal.
Just as the school year kicked off, families on opposite sides of the U.S. faced temporary school closures. Mother Nature was responsible for some. But not all. While several southeastern states dealt with the effects of Hurricane Dorian, across the country, one Arizona city encountered a very different type of scare. Cybercriminals waged a ransomware attack on the Flagstaff Unified School District, forcing a two-day shut down for 15 schools serving almost 10,000 students.
Flagstaff is far from alone. In July and August, 2019, the number of publicly disclosed security incidents in K-12 schools reached 160 — exceeding the total of all incidents experienced in 2018 by an incredible 30 percent. Nearly 50 school districts and colleges have been hit with ransomware so far in 2019 ranging in nature from disruptive, as in the case of the Flagstaff two-day closure, to catastrophic, which describes the scene in Louisiana when the governor recently declared a state of emergency following “severe, intentional security breaches” on school computer systems.
The Education Sector is Facing a Crisis
It’s one thing for impassible roads to hit pause on a school schedule. It’s an entirely different and unacceptable scenario when cyber extortion not only gets in the way of educating our youth but puts data pertaining to their health, academics and social development at risk of exposure and compromise — not to mention the public funds that are flushed away to ransom payments and cleanup efforts. Yet here we are, co-existing with cybercrime as the new normal and witnessing escalating ransomware attacks turn schools into the second-largest victims of all sectors.
The pace of growth of the “digital school district” continues to climb given the many benefits technology brings to students and educators. Funding for educational technology has increased by 62 percent in the last three years, and the new U.S. Digital Equity Act proposes to commit federal dollars to bring even more tech to the classroom. And while the many benefits of the digital classroom are clear, this rapid growth, combined with complexity and the continued restricted budgets for management, make our schools and our students increasingly vulnerable.
When Complexity and Risk Plague Today’s Digital Classroom, Resilience Matters
Technology is no doubt an asset, though we need to acknowledge not just the risks to student safety and privacy it poses, but also the complexity that IT folks have to wrangle. Education IT leaders once responsible for a few hundred devices, a few dozen apps and a single network have now found themselves managing tens of thousands of devices (as 82 percent of schools now provide students with them), hundreds of apps, and a distributed set of users accessing unknown networks — all with limited resources and budget in most cases. Meanwhile, by clicking on one bad link on a school-issued device, a student can become a conduit for a ransomware attack.
As endpoint and environmental complexities increase, and risk alongside them, it’s no surprise that 68 percent of education IT leaders in the U.S. list cybersecurity as their top priority. In tandem, several state governments, including Louisiana, Texas and North Dakota, have stepped up their efforts to safeguard schools against cyberattacks with various measures such as cyber policy mandates, cyber commission formation and state IT department oversight for schools.
For policymakers, educational institutions and their IT leaders, and even concerned parents, collaborative cybersecurity efforts should rally around the concept of resilience, or the ability to bounce back. Here are three steps to get on the path to cyber resiliency:

Battle the false sense of security. Millions of dollars of public funds are invested in applying security controls in schools — giving parents and educators a false sense of security. Many of these controls are fragile or by-passable — meaning that without consistent monitoring, you may be more exposed than you think. Make the most of the tools you already have and spend your budget on more impactful projects. Ask the question, “Are the controls we already have in place functioning at all times?”. Security controls cannot protect you when they are taken offline by wiley students, or bypassed. Foundational device controls include, at a minimum, anti-malware, encryption, authorized VPN, patch/client management, and web-filtering/firewalling on the client — and all need to be based on a platform that enable visibility and resilience for IT.
Strengthen your immune system. In the complex world of endpoint security, increased security spending does not equate to increased safety any more than taking more vitamins guarantees you will never get the flu. In fact, every additional security tool, while adding protection, also increases the complexity on the endpoint and therefore the probability of failure as agents. A recent Absolute study reveals that schools that have encryption in place experience agent failures on an average of nine devices per day — almost half of which never recover, leaving students and staff at risk of potential data breaches. In order to protect your students, your data and your investment, ensure you have fundamental controls activated to gain a persistent connection to each device — on or off the school network. It’s only then that you can repair or replace critical apps that have been disabled or removed.
Make cybersecurity the air students breathe. Creating a culture of online security and open communication about online threats is not just good practice, it’s an ethical responsibility. Turn it into a game; teach students what attackers do, test them on practical examples, and give each of them a sense of achievement when they win. Yammering on about ransomware crippling the school or how awful an attack would be for their district is unlikely to stop an 11-year-old trying to circumvent security policies. Let them know what villains may try to do, and challenge them to step up and help stop them. Provide a means for them to report suspicious online behavior without fear of punishment. Make them the hero of the cyber resilience story.

The pace of ransomware attacks on schools in 2019 suggests another victim will feel imminent pain and, as such, the urgency to heed these steps cannot be overstated. It’s a tricky balance but doable to enable the digital classroom to thrive, while also protecting student safety and privacy.

Improving Endpoint Security Needs to Be a Top Goal in 2020

This was post was originally published in Forbes Magazine.
Bottom Line:  Attacking endpoints with AI, bots, and machine learning is gaining momentum with cybercriminals today with no signs of slowing down into 2020, making endpoint security a must-have cybersecurity goal for next year.
Cyberattacks are growing more complex and difficult to prevent now and will accelerate in the future, making endpoint security a top goal in 2020. Cybercriminals are using structured and unstructured machine learning algorithms to hack organizations’ endpoints with increasing frequency. Endpoint attacks and their levels of complexity will accelerate as cybercriminals gain greater mastery of these techniques.
In response, endpoint protection providers are adopting machine learning-based detection and response technologies, providing more cloud-native solutions that can scale across a broader range of endpoints, and designing in greater persistence and resilience for each endpoint. The recent IDC survey published this month, Do You Think Your Endpoint Security Strategy Is Up to Scratch? completed in collaboration with HP recommends that “companies should seek to build resilience — on the assumption that breaches are inevitable — and look for “security by design” features that facilitate or automate detection and recovery.” IDC surveyed 500 senior security executives globally, finding major differences between leading organizations who realize endpoint security is essential for a unified cybersecurity strategy and followers, who don’t.
What Differentiates The Most Effective Endpoint Strategies?
IDC’s study found that leaders who integrate endpoint security into their cybersecurity plans are more effective at compliance reporting, endpoint hardening, and attack detection and response. Leaders capitalize on the data from their endpoint security strategies, creating contextual intelligence that helps protect their most vulnerable threat surfaces. The following are key insights from the IDC study showing why endpoint security needs to be an integral part of any corporate-wide cybersecurity strategy:

6% of all enterprises globally consider endpoint security to be a significant component of their overall cybersecurity strategy, with leaders 2X as likely to consider it a high priority.Close to half of all enterprises (49.4%) believe endpoint security can perform effectively as a secondary component. IDC found that the lesser the priority security leaders place on endpoint security, the more likely endpoints will fail. Instead of taking a strategic approach, organizations treat endpoint security as an isolated strategy, adding an average of 10 security agents per device according to Absolute’s 2019 Endpoint Security Trends Report. You can get a copy of the report here. Cybersecurity leaders realize that having a unified endpoint security strategy designed for persistence and resilience is far more effective than relying on an isolated one. The following findings from the IDC report illustrate how leaders view endpoint as integral to their cybersecurity strategies.
When enterprises are complacent about endpoint security, procurement standards become mediocre over time and leave digital businesses at greater risk. Followers lack security focus for everything other than desktops during procurement, for example. Though most enterprises include security requirements in procurement requests, those requirements are not specified equally for all endpoint device types, resulting in uneven security coverage and compliance risk.

IDC, DO YOU THINK YOUR ENDPOINT SECURITY STRATEGY IS UP TO SCRATCH? OCTOBER 2019

Automated operating system image recoverability, detect and recover firmware integrity breaches, and enabling software monitoring from the hardware level are the three most in-demand endpoint security features for enterprises today. Leader enterprises have relied on persistent connections to every endpoint in a network to achieve greater resilience across their global networks. Absolute is working to change this relationship, allowing remote, disconnected endpoints to remain resilient, which reflects what leaders are looking for in terms of greater control and visibility for every threat surface or endpoint. Senior security leaders, including CISOs, are taking a more integrated approach to endpoint security by designing in persistence to the device level that thwarts breach attempts in real-time. Absolute is working to change this relationship, allowing remote, disconnected endpoints to remain resilient.

IDC, DO YOU THINK YOUR ENDPOINT SECURITY STRATEGY IS UP TO SCRATCH? OCTOBER 2019

Enterprises who are cybersecurity leaders most value a device’s built-in security features when evaluating PCs, laptops, and mobile devices while followers value this feature least.33% of enterprises who are leaders prioritize devices that have built-in security capabilities that immediately provide persistent connections across the network, enabling greater resiliency. The study also makes the point that endpoint security needs to be tamper-proof at the operating system level, yet be flexible enough to provide IT and cybersecurity teams with device visibility and access to modify protections. One of the leaders in this area, Absolute, has invented endpoint security technology that begins at the BIOS level. There are currently 500M devices that have their endpoint code embedded in them. The Absolute Platform is comprised of three products: Persistence, Intelligence, and Resilience—each building on the capabilities of the other. The following graphic from the IDC study illustrates the stark contrast between enterprises who are cybersecurity leaders versus followers when it comes to adopting build-in security capabilities to harden endpoints across their networks.

IDC, DO YOU THINK YOUR ENDPOINT SECURITY STRATEGY IS UP TO SCRATCH? OCTOBER 2019
Conclusion
When 70% of all breaches originate at endpoints, despite enterprise IT spending more than ever in cybersecurity, it’s a clear sign that endpoint security needs to be an integral part of any cybersecurity strategy. On average, every endpoint has ten security agents installed, often leading to software conflicts and frequent endpoint encryption failures. Absolute’s latest study found that over 42% of endpoints experience encryption failures, leaving entire networks at risk from a breach. They’re most commonly disabled by users, malfunction, or have error conditions or have never been installed correctly in the first place. Absolute also found that endpoints often failed due to the fragile nature of their encryption agents’ configurations. 2% of encryption agents fail every week, and over half of all encryption failures occurred within two weeks, fueling a constant 8% rate of decay every 30 days. 100% of all devices experiencing encryption failures within one year. Multiple endpoint security solutions conflict with each other and create more opportunities for breaches than avert them. These are just a few of the many factors that make improving endpoint security a top goal all enterprises need to achieve in 2020.
 
 
 

Absolute CEO Christy Wyatt Recognized as Top 50 Women Leaders in SaaS of 2019

This week, The Software Report released their Top 50 Women Leaders in SaaS of 2019. It’s a distinguished group and their list of accomplishments across the software industry is both impressive and inspiring. We’d like to congratulate all the 2019 leader awardees and give a special shout out to one honoree in particular – our CEO Christy Wyatt.

Christy’s first-position ranking comes as a result of her ‘dedication to solving Absolute customers’ greatest enterprise resiliency challenges’ and long pedigree of leadership roles across the software industry. Congratulations to everyone on the Top 50 and our own Christy Wyatt!
Read the full list here.

It’s Time To Solve K-12’s Cybersecurity Crisis

This post was originally published in Forbes magazine by Louis Columbus.

There were a record 160 publicly-disclosed security incidents in K-12 during the summer months of 2019, exceeding the total number of incidents reported in all of 2018 by 30%.
47% of K-12 organizations are making cybersecurity their primary investment, yet 74% do not use encryption.
93% of K-12 organizations rely on native client/patch management tools that have a 56% failure rate, with 9% of client/patch management failures never recovered.

These and many other fascinating insights are from Absolute’s new research report, Cybersecurity and Education: The State of the Digital District in 2020​, focused on the state of security, staff and student safety, and endpoint device health in K-12 organizations. The study’s findings reflect the crisis the education sector is facing as they grapple with high levels of risk exposure – driven in large part by complex IT environments and a digitally savvy student population – that have made them a prime target for cybercriminals and ransomware attackers. The methodology is based on data from 3.2M devices containing Absolute’s endpoint visibility and control platform, active in 1,200 K-12 organizations in North America (U.S. and Canada). Please see full report for complete details on the methodology.
Here’s the backdrop:

K-12 cybersecurity incidents are skyrocketing, with over 700 reported since 2016 with 160 occurring during the summer of 2019 alone. Educational IT leaders face the challenge of securing increasingly complex IT environments while providing access to a digitally savvy student population capable of bypassing security controls. Schools are now the second-largest pool of ransomware victims, just behind local governments and followed by healthcare organizations. As of today, 49 school districts have been hit by ransomware attacks so far this year.

“Today’s educational IT leaders have been tasked with a remarkable feat: adopting and deploying modern learning platforms, while also ensuring student safety and privacy, and demonstrating ROI on security and technology investments,” said Christy Wyatt, CEO of Absolute.
Research from Absolute found:
K-12 IT leaders are now responsible for collectively managing more than 250 unique OS versions, and 93% are managing up to five versions of common applications. The following key insights from the study reflect how severe K-12’s cybersecurity crisis is today:

Digital technologies’ rapid proliferation across school districts has turned into a growth catalyst for K-12’s cybersecurity crisis. 94% of school districts have high-speed internet, and 82% provide students with school-funded devices through one-to-one and similar initiatives. Absolute found that funding for educational technology has increased by 62% in the last three years. The Digital Equity Act goes into effect this year, committing additional federal dollars to bring even more technology to the classroom. K-12 IT leaders face the daunting challenge of having to secure on average 11 device types, 258 unique operating systems versions and over 6,400 unique Chrome OS extensions and more, reflecting the broad scale of today’s K-12 cybersecurity crisis. Google Chromebooks dominate the K-12 device landscape. The following graphic illustrates how rapidly digital technologies are proliferating in K-12 organizations:

42% of K-12 organizations have staff and students regularly bypass security endpoint controls using web proxies and rogue VPN apps, inadvertently creating gateways for malicious outsiders to breach their schools’ networks. Absolute found that there are on average 10.6 devices with web proxy/rogue VPN apps per school and 319 unique web proxy/rogue VPN apps in use today, including “Hide My Ass” and “IP Vanish.”  Many of the rogue VPN apps originate in China, and all of them are designed to evade web filtering and other content controls. With an average of 10.6 devices per school harboring web proxies and rogue VPN apps, schools are also at risk of non-compliance with the Children’s Internet Protection Act (CIPA).

While 68% of education IT leaders say that cybersecurity is their top priority, 53% rely on client/patch management tools that are proving ineffective in securing their proliferating IT infrastructures. K-12 IT leaders are relying on client/patch management tools to secure the rapidly proliferating number of devices, operating systems, Chrome extensions, educational apps, and unique application versions. Client/patch management agents fail 56% of the time, however, and 9% never recover. There are on average, nine daily encryption agents’ failures, 44% of which never recover. The cybersecurity strategy of relying on native client/patch management isn’t working, leading to funds being wasted on K-12 security controls that don’t scale:

“Wyatt continued, this is not something that can be achieved by simply spending more money… especially when that money comes from public funds. The questions they each need to be asking are if they have the right foundational security measures in place, and whether the controls they have already invested in are working properly. Without key foundational elements of a strong and resilient security approach in place – things like visibility and control, it becomes nearly impossible to protect your students, your data, and your investments.”
Providing greater device visibility and endpoint security controls while enabling applications and devices to be more resilient is a solid first step to solving the K-12 cybersecurity crisis. Thwarting the many breach and ransomware attacks K-12 organizations receive every day needs to start by considering every device as part of the network perimeter. Securing K-12 IT networks to the device level delivers asset management and security visibility that native client/patch management tools lack. Having visibility to the device level also gives K-12 IT administrators and educators insights into how they can tailor learning programs for broader adoption. The greater the visibility, the greater the control. K-12 IT administrators can ensure internet safety policies are being adhered to while setting controls to be alerted of a suspicious activity or non-compliant devices, including rogue VPNs or stolen devices. Absolute’s Persistence platform provides a persistent connection to each endpoint in a K-12’s one-to-one program, repairing or replacing critical apps that have been disabled or removed.
You can download the full Absolute report here.

5 Things to Check Off Your Security Checklist in October

October is National Cybersecurity Awareness Month, and the very existence of this ‘holiday’ affirms it is more important than ever to make sure your digital data is secure. To help get you on the right track, we’ve put together a quick security checklist of five simple, but impactful, steps you can take to better protect yourself today. 
1) Update your Operating System.
Updates and patches for your Operating System and applications are made available almost daily.  In many cases, these updates and security fixes are essential to keep your computer healthy and your data safe. If you find it tiresome keeping on top of these important updates, turn on Auto-Update.
2) Download, Activate and Keep Antivirus, Anti-malware and Firewall Software Up to Date.
Antivirus, anti-malware and firewall software can protect your device and data from malicious activity in the form of corrupted files, attack code and processes. Don’t forget to install, activate and keep these essential security features up to date.
3) Pay Attention to Passwords.
Strong password hygiene is worth emphasizing and repeating. Don’t use the same password for everything; use unique combinations of 8-14 uppercase and lowercase letters, numbers, and non alphanumeric characters. You must also make sure to keep your passwords somewhere safe. Storing them digitally in an encrypted password protector is often a good choice, but you can always write them down in a book the old-fashioned way.
4) Backup your Important Files.
Determine what’s mission critical, and create and keep multiple backups of your most important data, just in case. Store the files in the cloud via a trusted service provider; on secure flash drives or external hard drives; or using physical media like DVDs. If the unthinkable happens and your primary machine is corrupted, lost, or stolen, you’ll be glad you did.
5) Do not click on suspicious links or open questionable attachments received via email.
Even if (you think) an email comes from someone that you know, use caution. Phishing and email scams are a persistent method of computer infection. Always double check the sender’s email address, attachment filenames and extensions for abnormalities. If it doesn’t feel genuine, it probably isn’t.
Have you already taken these precautions? Do you travel with your laptop often? Absolute Home & Office can provide an extra layer of security and control by enabling you to Locate your machine on a map, Lock or Delete it’s contents remotely or, in the case of an actual theft, communicate with authorities to Recover it. Absolute Home & Office Premium is available for 33% off until October 31st.

Absolute Named Leader in G2 Fall 2019 Grid Report for Endpoint Management

Thanks to high levels of customer satisfaction and positive reviews from verified users, G2 has – for the second time this year – named Absolute a leader in the Fall 2019 Grid Report for Endpoint Management Software. Absolute ranked 10th overall out of 150 total vendors in the category, and was named a top vendor based on positive verified user reviews and high levels of customer satisfaction. The reviews highlight the power of the Absolute platform in delivering endpoint security and resiliency.
With more than 790,000 verified user reviews on the platform, G2 helps buyers make more informed purchasing decisions, allowing them to compare the best software and services for their needs based on peer reviews, satisfaction scores, and synthesized social data.
“Absolute is the last-stand in our IT security profile. I like how it integrates with the BIOS to do its thing most of all. Once installed, it’s essentially and hands-off piece of software. And because it is at that low level it can do many things that similar software cannot. But I would be remiss if I didn’t mention the ability to track and recover lost or stolen laptops.” – Senior Network Administrator/IT Manager
Christy Wyatt, CEO of Absolute had this to say about inclusion in the recently released G2 Grid Report: “We are honored and grateful that our customers are willing to go to bat for us and publicly recognize our product innovation, execution, and dedication to continuous optimization and improvement. At Absolute, our number one goal is to be a trusted partner in making our customers more resilient and deliver the visibility, persistence, and intelligence they need to securely and confidently move their businesses forward.”
Get the full G2 Fall 2019 Grid Report for Endpoint Management Software here. To learn more about what real users have to say about Absolute or to leave your own review, visit our G2 profile.

Absolute Recognized as Hot 150 Cybersecurity Company to Watch in 2020

Absolute was recognized this week by Cybersecurity Ventures in their Hot 150 Cybersecurity Companies to Watch in 2020. As cyber risk climbs, so too grows the number of security vendors. This new ranking is a feature of ‘the hottest and most innovative’ cybersecurity companies in the market today.
Hot 150 selection criteria includes such as areas as: challenges addressed, feedback from CISOs, customer base and notable implementations, founder and management pedigree, company revenue growth and others. Among the Hot 150, 68 companies are headquartered in the U.S. and Canada.
See the full Hot 150 Cybersecurity Companies in Watch in 2020 in Cybercrime Magazine.
 

How Machine Learning Can Avert Cyber Disasters

High winds capable of downing power lines across a very-dry Northern California are causing officials to shutoff power this week for hundreds of thousands of residents. The decision came as a way to reduce the threat of wildfires in an area already hard-hit by natural disaster.
Mother Nature is once again flexing her powerful muscles and Californians are left to cope as best they can, with the information they have. This week’s weather event is yet another example of why researchers are working on how to use machine learning (ML) as a disaster preparedness and response tool. Because machines can quickly analyze massive amounts of data from numerous sources, the goal is to use that information to help community leaders and emergency response teams make more informed decisions.
Like natural disaster preparedness and response, ML also has important implications for endpoint security and the disaster that could originate on an endpoint while under cyberattack. As our CTO, Nicko van Someren explains in the below video prepared for National Cybersecurity Awareness Month, ML is key to improved security by way of a direct pull through from IT asset management.
An IT Asset Management Job with a Security Outcome
Within the context of IT asset management, organizations are busier than ever trying to manage the growing number of endpoint devices, applications and data. IT complexity has reached all-time highs. ML has been a very valuable tool for managing that complexity and, while doing so, can also make direct contributions to better security and more resilient endpoints. With the power of ML, you’re not only gaining improved visibility into your assets, you’re learning more about the actions and events happening there and finding patterns.
With patterns inevitably come outliers and so often, that’s where vulnerabilities hide. Being able to recognize outliers and remediating any resulting risk is how endpoints – and enterprises – become more resilient.
As Nicko explains: “Keeping machines up to date is an IT management job, but it’s a security outcome. Knowing what devices should be on my network is an IT management problem, but it has a security outcome. And knowing what’s going on and what processes are running and what’s consuming network bandwidth is an IT management problem, but it’s a security outcome. I don’t see these as distinct activities so much as seeing them as multiple facets of the same problem space.”
The growing number of assets is a challenge, certainly. And as security becomes an increasingly critical risk, organizations have been layering on more and more security tools – ten or more agents on each endpoint, says our research. But increased security spend does not equate to improved security. That much is painfully clear. Instead, you’re left with a complex environment full of competing, fallible agents and, consequently, a false sense of security.
Visibility is key and ML can deliver a complete data set that then gives you invaluable insight on what is happening on your endpoints. This way, you can work to reduce complexity and improve endpoint resiliency.
To learn more about the role of ML with IT complexity, watch our newest Cybersecurity Insights video below. And, subscribe to our complete YouTube series.
Complexity is Killing IT

Cybercriminals Take Aim at K-12

The school year is underway and millions of devices are now in the hands of students. More than 80 percent of today’s K-12 organizations provide computers to students and an estimated 70 percent of schools will be one-to-one by 2020.  With school-issued devices commonplace, schools have become easy targets for cyberattacks.
Since 2016, nearly 700 cyber incidents have hit K-12 organizations. And threats like ransomware have forced schools to close their doors, and even compelled Louisiana’s Governor to declare a state of emergency after several schools were wrecked by the Ryuk ransomware in the summer of 2019.
The K-12 attack surface has lured cybercriminals, but the technology itself has also become somewhat of a nightmare. In Absolute’s new study, Cybersecurity and Education: The State of the Digital District in 2020, we looked at 3.2 million devices across 1,200 schools and discovered over 6,400 unique Chrome extensions in-use, 319 security bypass apps (e.g. rogue VPN), and more than 130,000 app versions. The IT complexity is staggering.

Based on the new research, we see three key challenges facing today’s K-12 technology leaders – challenges no other industry faces.

Savvy students — more than five times as many tools for users to tunnel around security controls and policies than other sectors. (rogue apps were found in 42 percent of organizations)

Increased complexity — within five years, K-12 IT leaders have gone from managing a couple of operating systems, a handful of apps, and a few hundred devices to managing hundreds of versions of operating systems, apps, extensions, and thousands of devices. (93 percent of common apps are outdated)

Increased endpoint risk — as complexity expands, so does risk, leaving both students and schools increasingly vulnerable to cyberattacks. Case in point: schools have become the second-largest pool of ransomware victims, slightly behind local governments and closely followed by healthcare organizations. (56 percent of patch agents fail)

It is no surprise then, that 68 percent of K-12 IT leaders say cybersecurity is their top priority, and nearly half (47 percent) say their primary investment will be security controls and tools. But K-12 IT leaders must carefully consider their plans for more security spend and take aim at cyber resilience above all else.
School districts are saddled with the expectation to demonstrate ROI (the effects of the one-to-one program) but on the other hand, they need to keep tabs on security and inventory gaps in a quickly growing endpoint population. Read: Quantifying K-12 Device Use with Absolute.
How do you solve the riddle? Resilience is the key.
Winning the Battle Against Cyber Threats
It is increasingly critical school districts work to reduce IT complexity and improve endpoint resiliency by gaining visibility to every device everywhere. Then, IT leaders can identify use patterns, justify tech spend for maximum ROI, and discover device use patterns and rogue apps, how often devices are used, and what risks students are creating. K-12 IT leaders can rely on Absolute to unmask complexity risks and automate endpoint security—restoring fragile security controls, apps, and agents—to safeguard digital learning for the next generation.
To learn more about the cyber risks facing today’s K-12 schools, download the full report Cybersecurity and Education: The State of the Digital District in 2020.
 

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